Bollywood Movie Reviews

Saturday, Jan 23, 2021 | Last Update : 03:49 PM IST

  Reviews

Reviews

  • Review: Maara: Visually striking but flawed

    Review: Maara: Visually striking but flawed


    The first thing that strikes you about Maara is it is a visually striking film. That's also about the last thing that strikes you, because almost all else that goes on in between is lost in storytelling that is too lazy to hold interest.

  • Review: Coolie No. 1: Not cool

    Review: Coolie No. 1: Not cool


    Coolie No. 1 (on Amazon Prime Video); Varun Dhawan, Sara Ali Khan, Paresh Rawal, Javed Jaffrey, Rajpal Yadav, Johnny Lever, Sahil Vaid, Shikha Talsania, Vikas Verma, Manoj Joshi, Anil Dhawan, Bharati Achrekar; Direction: David Dhawan; Rating * * (two stars)

  • Review: Unpaused: Hampered by uneven storytelling

    Review: Unpaused: Hampered by uneven storytelling


    Tannishtha Chatterjee directs Rat-a-Tat, about a young girl (Rinku Rajguru) and her grumpy elderly neighbour (Lillete Dubey). The neighbour is hostile towards the girl to begin with, but they strike a bond somewhere in their quest for purpose in life and hope.

  • Review: Soul: Blends the cute with the complex

    Review: Soul: Blends the cute with the complex


    Jamie Foxx voices Joe Gardner the pianist, bringing alive the vision of writer-director Pete Docter and his co-writers (Kemp Powers and Mike Jones) as the narrative unfolds the protagonist's adventure.

  • Review: The Last Color: Low on grey shades

    Review: The Last Color: Low on grey shades


    The Last Color seems like a ‘showcase Indian film', the sort that the festival circuit in the West easily laps up. The film highlights a few societal ills specific to India, against the lavishly ethnic backdrop of Benaras.

  • Review: A Call To Spy: Important slice of history

    Review: A Call To Spy: Important slice of history


    You would expect more suspense and drama given the subject at hand, and the sense of overall underwhelming does surprise you. Director Lydia Dean Pilcher has borrowed from one of the most intriguing chapters of World War II, but her effort fails to fully engage because the film falters at a storytelling level.

  • Review: Durgamati: Low on scares, high on cliches

    Review: Durgamati: Low on scares, high on cliches


    ou were just beginning to get excited about new-age Bollywood horror after cutting-edge stuff as Stree and Tumbbad. Then came Laxmii, and now Durgamati -- as rude reminder that Bollywood horror still has some way to go.

  • Review: Mank: Hollywood in black and white, and grey

    Review: Mank: Hollywood in black and white, and grey


    It is the turn of David Fincher this time, to romance Hollywood in black and white. Hollywood loves this sort of an introspection once in a while, which harks back to its glory days and deconstructing the grime beneath the glamour.

  • Review: Ava: Cliches kill the thrills

    Review: Ava: Cliches kill the thrills


    From Anna to Hanna to Atomic Blonde or Unlocked, the ladies in Hollywood have been doing brisk business too, playing the killer within the assassin/spy template. It's Jessica Chastain's turn now to get going with formulaic kills.

  • Review: Mosul: Gritty, gripping war drama

    Review: Mosul: Gritty, gripping war drama


    The film begins at a time the violence in Mosul is ebbing and the Nineveh province's SWAT unit, comprising local men who have been directly or indirectly affected by the scourge of ISIS, is on a final mission.